New Google Speed Update Increases Importance of Mobile Load Speed

 

Google’s been using the speed at which your website downloads on desktop/laptop computers as a ranking signal for some time.

Since 2010, actually.

Up until now, that hasn’t been the case for mobile devices.

But now it is.

…And it doesn’t work exactly as you’d expect.

For example, Google says that for now it only affects pages that “deliver the slowest experience to users.”

In terms of Google updates, even though this one sounds huge, it actually only affects a relatively small number of searches and websites.

Google also admitted in its public announcement that content still plays a much larger role in ranking. So, if you have amazingly useful content, a slow website still won’t trash your rankings.

That’s Not the Only Reason You Should Have a Fast-Loading Website for Mobile Devices

Yes. It’s going to hurt your rankings (and by extension sales) if you happen to be one of the “slowest” loading sites.

But that’s not the only reason you should feel concerned to make your website download as fast as possible on all device types.

What do you really care about at the end of the day?

Sales, right?

Well, the faster your website downloads, the more sales you get. Hundreds and thousands of case studies have documented extensively the strong relationship between website speed and sales.

Here’s just a few:

  • Amazon loses $1.6 billion per year for each second slower its product pages load
  • One mPulse study found pages that load in 2.4 seconds get a 1.9% conversion rate. At 3.3 seconds, this falls to 1.5% (a 21% decrease). At 4.2 seconds, this falls below 1.0% – or about a 50% decrease.
  • Shopzilla found faster pages deliver 7-12% more sales than slower ones
  • AutoAnything found cutting page load time in half led to 13% more sales

You can read more brief case studies about this at Hubspot. And if you want nearly endless reading on the subject, just Google “how page speed affects conversions,” or something similar.

The point is that page download speed undoubtedly has a noticeable effect on sales.

Give Yourself a Quick Check

Google has a PageSpeed tool that tells you what you can do to improve your page’s download speed.

Don’t worry so much about the score. Look more at what it suggests you do to improve your page’s speed.

Lighthouse also sheds light on the issue.

When you think about it, if you do fix a page download speed issue, it’s only a one-time cost. And then you reap the sales rewards for years into the future.

And you’re absolutely guaranteed Google won’t reverse its stance. The market demands fast websites and instant gratification…and always will!

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