6 Top Questions and Answers about SMB SEO

SEO isn’t easy. Nope. Not at all. Especially today. And it’s not going to get any easier. 

Plus, it’s changed dramatically from what it used to be 5 years ago.

Take a look at some of the top questions and answers about SEO in 2017 below:

  1. Is SEO right for my SMB?

Maybe. Maybe not. Today, you need a significant budget to achieve any kind of rankings. If you’re in a competitive market, you may easily need several thousand dollars per month. And you may also need time…upwards of at least a year before you begin to see results.

In some cases you may be competing with large brands, and it may be difficult, and nearly impossible, to overtake them in search.

  1. How will my SEO company help me win in search?

SEO these days is quite open-ended. There’s no one path to the top. Yes, there’s good solid fundamentals that help you succeed (on-page optimization, fast page load times, rock-solid content etc…).

But what’s your specific strategy?

Ask your SEO about your site and competition to see how they’re going to help you win in search.

  1. How do you attract links to my site?

Links are the lifeblood of any website. But not just any old links. You want high-quality links from reputable websites.

Google likes some ways you get links (promoting your content). But it doesn’t care for other ways you might choose to get links (building them on forums or placing them on directories).

In fact, doing the latter could completely ruin your website rankings. It’s important to know precisely how your SEO company will attract links to your website.

  1. Can you share a case study of a similar company you helped succeed?

Local SMBs can vary markedly by industry. Your SEO company may not have worked with another SMB that’s in exactly the same industry.

But they should have a customer story or two featuring another company in a similar industry. And they should be able to share exactly what they did to help that company achieve search success – as well as the results they got.

  1. What metrics do you measure to track progress?

Small business SEO is tricky…even for SEO companies. Your SEO company should be able to show you keyword rankings, the total number of pages on your website receiving search traffic, and the total amount of organic search traffic you get monthly.

  1. Do you have a contract?

If you like a SEO company’s approach, but they don’t have an extensive and verifiable track record, sign a contract with an opt-out clause after 3 months. Don’t sign a long-term contract if you don’t have concrete measures of the company’s reputation. If they do have a reputation you can research and verify online, then you can feel more comfortable signing a one-year contract.

Those are some of the most common questions you may ask a SEO company. Keep them in mind in your search going forward.

Watch Out for Bad SEO Information

As good as the Internet has become, the truth is web pages last forever. Theoretically, they can be found in any year – even though Google pushes the bad pages down its search rankings.

So, bad SEO advice can stay on the web for the rest of eternity. Then, what used to be great SEO advice, actually becomes bad SEO advice because Google’s changed how the game works.

It’s quite easy to read a blog post, think you’ve discovered a brand-new tactic that works, but end up doing something that doesn’t work at all, or even hurts your website rankings.

How Do You Spot Bad SEO Advice?

Let me explain the ultra-conservative way to use to make sure you’re reading only good SEO advice:

  1. Only Learn from the Most Reputable Blogs and Communities

Active blogs and communities only accept top-notch guest content. Or when they publish their own, they do an equally amazing job.

Their posts should get thousands of social shares. You should see at least 1,000 shares on the majority of their posts. Ideally, that number should be higher.

A blog with hundreds isn’t necessarily one to ignore. But if you’re being ultra-conservative, only wanting to stick to what really works, aim for thousands of shares.

  1. Does the SEO Have a Test To Back Their Claims Up?

Leading SEO minds always have their own test to back up what they say. They won’t say anything new, different, or controversial if they don’t have hard data standing behind it.

Google changes so much and so fast that you can make up a lot of different stuff and claim it works. The bright minds know you can’t get away with telling SEOs whatever you want.

Your SEO should have done the test themselves. Or, they should have a link they can send you that backs up any questionable claim they make.

  1. You Must Be Able to Understand What the SEO Says

SEO gets technical. Really technical. But that shouldn’t make it hard to understand. Even though some of the language and concepts get technical, a competent and trustworthy SEO can make them easily understandable…even if you consider yourself a SEO novice.

So, if you find yourself bombarded with “geek speak,” ask for clarification. Shoot, ask for clarification even if you know what the SEO means, just to test what they’re saying.

If you’re careful, it should be difficult to fall victim to bad SEO advice. Treat it like your most important business decision because it is going to significantly alter the destiny of your business.

Proximity to Searcher Now the #1 Ranking Factor for Local Search

Moz, a leading thinker on SEO, annually gathers the opinions of dozens of local SEO experts. They compile the data into a report to find out what really works in local SEO each year.

In 2017, experienced SEO consultants ranked “proximity to searcher” the most influential search ranking factor.

That’s ahead of links, citations, on-page SEO…you name it.

So, I guess you need to create a flying warehouse that uses drones for distribution like Amazon’s talked about?

They have a patent for it – true story!

Anyway, you can’t do that now. But until you can, focus on doing good solid local SEO so searchers can find you.

Besides your proximity to the searcher, what else can you do? Here’s a brief list of other factors, according to the survey from Moz:

  • Having a Physical Address in the City Searched

    Google’s relaxed on this one a little, much to the relief of SEOs here in the DFW Metroplex. It makes sense that, if you’re in the city where the searcher executes the search, you come up for the search.At the same time, what if you’re in a different suburb, but physically closer than a similar business who is in the suburb where the search happens?

    Google accounts for this more effectively when searchers search. Ideally though, you have a physical address in the city searched.

  • Link Quality

    Links have always been powerful for your rankings. While they’ve lost some strength over the years, they’re still strong today.And they’ll continue to be strong in the future, even though other factors may gain some potency too.

    Why?

    Links simply vouch for your website’s quality. Get a link from the New York Times, and you look awesome. Earn a link from a porn site, and you don’t look so good.

    The more links you get from other quality sites, the better. Because, Google only figures good sites link to other good sites.

  • Citation Consistency

    A “citation” is a mention of your NAP (name, address, phone number) information. You must be consistent with this…to the letter!If your address is “123 Fake St.,” Google gets annoyed when you so much as say “123 Fake Street” instead.

So, you have to decide on one way to discuss your address on the web, and then use only that information. And if you have a change, go back to all the other websites where it’s mentioned and get them to change it.

Kind of a pain. But the reality of today’s local SEO.

That’s Far From All…

Those are some of the most important local search ranking factors. But it’s not a complete list.

You can actually read them all in Moz’s 2017 Local Search Ranking Factor survey.

Here’s to high rankings in 2017 and beyond!

4 Modern Link-Building Tactics That Don’t Anger Google

Google’s most recent algorithm update,”Fred,” nailed websites that used low-quality links to maintain their search rankings. Many of these websites used “link building” from SEO companies to get their search positions.

However, Google doesn’t like “built” links as they were doing them. At the same time, your SEO company can still “build” links. It’s just that it has to be done in a certain way so that Google doesn’t penalize you for your links.

What has to be done? Ask your SEO company how they build links. If they’re doing it in ways that Google likes, they should say they do one or more of these:

  1. Manual Email Outreach to Influential People in Your Niche

Google wants “natural” links. In an ideal, perfect world, a natural link is one that someone decided to post on their website because they thought your content was so useful it was worth linking to.

Well, you can’t get any closer to that than by emailing a website owner or editor of a content-heavy website and letting them know you have a piece of super-useful content their audience would love. Not every one will give you a link. But some will.

And those links are as close to “natural” as you can get.

  1. Social Media Promotion to Your Followers

Nothing gets easier than this. Every website owner does it. Unfortunately, that’s where promotion for most website owners ends.

But you should do it. Make sure only 20% of your posts (at most) go back to your content. Watch your analytics to see which posts get shared the most. Then, reshare them after 3-4 months or so.

  1. Guest Blogging

A few years ago, Google said it would penalize guest blogging. The SEO community, however, overreacted.

Unfortunately, guest blogging can be manipulated just like any other link building method. Spammy, low-quality blogs exist which have virtually no audience. And they sound like they’re written by third-graders.

Those aren’t really “blogs.” They’re designed exclusively for the purpose of getting links.

However, get posted at a blog with an audience of a few hundred to a few thousand people, and Google loves that link. It knows that website already. It knows it has an active and engaged audience.

It’s a legit community. Google loves links from places like those.

  1. Create a Joint Venture

Who serves the same audience you do? Who doesn’t directly compete with you to serve that audience?

Say you’re an HVAC company. Look for a plumbing company. Offer to work together on a blog post, which both of you will post on your websites and social media profiles.

You’ll each win links and social media followers. But you won’t hurt each other’s businesses.

Just make sure you target a company with a similar audience size as yours. If you go for the “big guys,” they won’t be interested because they don’t stand to benefit as much as you. However, they might go for an in-depth blog post from you because their audience would love your niche experience, and they can’t provide it themselves.

Links Will Remain the Currency of the Web

Social shares have gained some importance when determining your search rankings. But for right now, and the foreseeable future, links will have greater power than social shares.

Work with an SEO company who understands how to provide you with high-value links that don’t get on Google’s bad side.

How to Get High-Income Consumers with Adwords

Many people believe consumers with high incomes need to hear fancy language to buy. That’s not true.

They talk just about the same as anyone else. However, the difference is what they talk about.

With that in mind, we want to tell you about an income targeting feature available in Adwords. In fact, you can target incomes like this:

  • Top 10% (household income: $146,001 +)
  • 11-20% ($131,001       – $146,000)
  • 21-30% ($111,001 – $131,000)
  • 31-40% ($96,001 – $111,000)
  • 41-50% ($64,001 – $96,000)
  • Lower 50% ($0 -$64,000)

…But there is a little bit of a catch. You always have to be careful with Adwords. Remember, it’s Google’s number one source of profit – by far. No other revenue stream of theirs even comes close. It’s to their advantage to look good to their investors. When you make mistakes or don’t understand how Adwords works, Google makes money.

In this case, if you target people by city or zip code in addition to income, that targeting trumps the income. This time, that makes sense. But, we’re just giving you a word of caution so you don’t use Adwords blind and suddenly find yourself in trouble.

In Adwords, you simply go to “Settings > All Settings > Advanced Search > Location Groups > Demographics > Select Household Income Tier.”

Of course, if you know the income range of your customers, then you’d only want to target that range, right? Otherwise, you’ll get clicks with zero-to-little chance of making a sale, which means you’ve wasted your time and money targeting that demographic.

 

How This Comes Into Play in DFW

We have a wide range of incomes here in the Metroplex, and certainly our fair share of high-income earners. But, imagine you know the income of the customer you want to attract.

For example, you sell fancy audio-video home theater systems, and you know people who make $100,000 or more would have an interest in them. Well, now you can target suburbs of DFW where that makes sense. And then you can target the right household income range.

Then, to make it work, you sell the experience of having an amazing home theatre with comfortable seating. Avoid the temptation to use fancy, flowery language. That’s the stuff you see on TV. People who buy home theatres want the intense experience – one that’s way better than watching a regular TV.

And that’s how you use Adwords’ income targeting to your advantage.

Google Releases Its Own Recommendations for Hiring a SEO Consultant

Shot of two male colleagues working on a computer at the office

 

Seems a little late to the game, doesn’t it? SEO’s been around as a practice since 2000. It’s had a reasonably popular reputation since 2008 or so.

You can actually see the video on YouTube here:

Here’s some of the main highlights of the video if you prefer to read instead of watch:

  1. SEO is not “black magic.” It’s a legit practice. Some shady SEO companies certainly treat it like black magic. But Google says it’s definitely a legitimate thing.
  2. You can’t use quick tricks to rank number one in just a few short weeks. You could have done that 12-15 years ago. But SEO isn’t that easy anymore.
  3. Successful SEO helps your site put its best foot forward so it ranks appropriately. No surprises here. Searchers want the best websites at the top of Google’s rankings. This demand forces Google to continue to improve its algorithm so that happens.
  4. Good SEOs ensure you give your online customers a good experience. This certainly follows from the previous point. Spammy tactics, shortcuts, and fast results are not promised by good SEOs.
  5. It takes 4-12 months to rank. Good SEOs need time to implement improvements. And they need some more time for Google to pick up on those and rank your website accordingly.
  6. The best thing you can do is to get a SEO who correlates their recommendation to a documented statement from Google. Google has great resources for this. You’re better off Googling the specific recommendation. But, a couple resources include Google’s Webmaster Search Console and the Official Google Webmaster Central Blog.
  7. In most cases, doing what’s good for SEO is good for your customers (and vice-versa). Again, this relates to points made earlier. Users want websites where they can learn what they want fast and either order it, or save your site and come back to it later to learn more, until they are ready to order.
  8. Conduct a two-way interview with your SEO. There’s several aspects to this. First, try to make sure the SEO is genuinely interested in your business. Check their references. Ask for a search audit (which will cost you money). Finally, make your decision to hire (or not hire) the SEO.

So that’s how Google says to hire a SEO. It’s good, commonsense, practical advice that helps you make a great decision you won’t regret.